the prognosis for wm 7

mikelove

皇帝
Staff member
I don't love everything Apple does myself - I dual-boot my Mac Pro into Windows 7 whenever I'm not actually writing iPhone-specific code - but at this point iPhone is the only platform left (other than Symbian, but interest in that is fairly minimal) that our old code works on without a major rewrite. So it's iPhone or do-everything-over-on-Android. Makes me wish we hadn't spent so long writing all of that cross-platform C code for Pleco 2.0, but who'd have known that C would go from the dominant programming language for mobile devices to an also-ran in such a short interval?

The "good enough" problem is significant, though: other expensive licensed dictionaries aren't our real competition on iPhone, those guys are, not because they compare with Pleco features-wise but because they lower the baseline enough that they pull our prices down (and make even the prices we do charge seem extremely high, which definitely hurts sales).

(but maybe I should buy / start carrying a Nexus One just to see if it can push me over the cliff; seems unlikely Android will have built-in Chinese handwriting on non-Chinese phones anytime soon, so there's a big advantage we'd have over prospective $5 apps)
 

sfrrr

状元
mikelove said:
I don't love everything Apple does myself - I dual-boot my Mac Pro into Windows 7 whenever I'm not actually writing iPhone-specific code - but at this point iPhone is the only platform left (other than Symbian, but interest in that is fairly minimal) that our old code works on without a major rewrite. So it's iPhone or do-everything-over-on-Android. Makes me wish we hadn't spent so long writing all of that cross-platform C code for Pleco 2.0, but who'd have known that C would go from the dominant programming language for mobile devices to an also-ran in such a short interval?

The "good enough" problem is significant, though: other expensive licensed dictionaries aren't our real competition on iPhone, those guys are, not because they compare with Pleco features-wise but because they lower the baseline enough that they pull our prices down (and make even the prices we do charge seem extremely high, which definitely hurts sales).

(but maybe I should buy / start carrying a Nexus One just to see if it can push me over the cliff; seems unlikely Android will have built-in Chinese handwriting on non-Chinese phones anytime soon, so there's a big advantage we'd have over prospective $5 apps)
It pushed Linus Torvald (I probably misspelled that) over the cliff. But, perhaps he doesn't study Chinese.

What about setting PD up as the luxury app, the one that gives you paddle-shifting, heated and cooled seats, a refrigerator in the back seat panel, and 400 horses under the hood?
 

mfcb

状元
one thing everybody seems to be neglecting is, that now MS turns into the same direction as Apple/Google. everything seems to become web-based, i save my personal data over the air, i get all data over the air, i cant program and customize the device like i want (without additional lifelong learning/hacking/jailbreaking/whatever).

hey, we are talking about a chinese dictionary here, where will i have the most benefit to use it? right, in china.... looking at the not-so-long-ago-and-maybe-still-not-healed problems between google and the chinese government, i have no real good feeling to rely on a phone/pc that stores its data "somewhere". in fact i would hate that...

seems, that i must accelerate my learning, prepare the cash for spare-devices/batteries/whatever-else-needed-accessories and hope that the stuff has a lifespan exceeding mine...
 

goulniky

榜眼
The main problem with web-based is it requires web access... which despite being ubiquitous in most places, wifi, 3G or otherwise, still isn't everywhere even in the West : think of trains, planes and a few not so isolated places where you just can't get a decent / stable connection.
For instance, there are a number of good Japanese web apps accessing publing domain dictionaries, it just gets frustrating when you need them and you don't get a response.
 

ipsi

状元
Hmmm... Looks interesting, I think. Only had a brief look, but the UI seems very nice. Guess the question is, what does it bring to the party that Android, iPhone and WebOS don't?

mikelove said:
who'd have known that C would go from the dominant programming language for mobile devices to an also-ran in such a short interval?
That's a little surprising, it must be said. I wonder if it's an attempt to increase developer share by making things 'easier' for the developer?

(Caveat for the following: I am a Java developer, and have done basically no work with C/C++/Obj C, or Dot Net).

If you'll forgive the detour, I wouldn't be surprised if someone at Microsoft (and Android and Palm) has said "C/C++/Obj C is too hard to learn and too hard to use correctly - let's give them something easier". Of course, easier is pretty subjective, especially if all your experience is in C. But all the higher-level languages like C#, VB, Java, Javascript, Silverlight (assuming that's the language name), etc., all mean that it takes less code, generally, to write what you want. They give you all sorts of clever tricks that are much harder to do in C. They take away all that 'fun' memory management.

The above are all generalizations, and they don't hold true all the time (you do still have to think about memory in Java, and there are some things you simply cannot do in Java, like pointer arithmetic), but I think they hold true enough of the time that whoever makes these decisions probably feels that having an 'easy' high-level language by default will attract more developers, and get more applications out there faster. And that's probably true. I imagine that the number of C/C++/Obj C developers, as percentage of total developers, is declining simply due to the fact that Java and Dot Net own the Enterprise Backend landscape, and Javascript owns the browser scripting landscape. That was, in fact, one of the reasons Palm is offering JS/CSS/HTML as the default on WebOS - to appeal to the largest segment of developers.

Also on the developer mind-share front, my University didn't have any compulsory courses in C/C++ - first year programming was all Java, as was one of the four second year papers, and several of the third year ones. I would not be at all surprised to find that the majority of Universities are similar, teaching either Java or Dot Net in their introductory courses. And when the majority of developers are educated in those languages, it could be argued that it makes sense to attract them by making one of them the primary language of your platform.

So yeah, easier to find developers who can write code for your platform without retraining and generally easier to write code for your platform have probably lead to a move away from low-level stuff like C, and towards Java/Dot Net. It helps that smartphones are getting more and more powerful, so the inefficiency/memory consumption arguments are getting weaker.

Sure, they still offer C interfaces for games, where speed and absolute memory control are critical, but games have this funny tendency to create their own UI completely from scratch, and don't generally require much in the way of UI APIs.

But that's just my opinion - even if the above is not actually true, I still think it's basically what's going through the minds of Palm/Google/Microsoft.

Oh, and if people have to use *your* language to write for your devices, that's Vendor Lock-in, and they're not going anywhere else due to the effort of rewriting their code. Again, not completely true, but true enough, I think.

Anyway, back on topic: Pleco as a Web App is possibly the best option... Sure, you have to deal with each platforms browsers quirks, but that should just involve massaging your code, rather than a complete rewrite for each major platform. And sure, it comes with a whole different set of problems (like making sure it still feels responsive even with major latency, which is something I think a lot of developers forget about), but if you're going to have to go through all that anyway for a single platform, then you might as well go for a web app. Also means that *everything* is under your complete control, and you don't have any of this silly 'app store approval process' crap to go through - if someone wants to use it, they point their browser to it. Simple as pie.
 
Adobe Air sounds exciting, but I assume it will go the way of Java and every other attempt to simplify development. Though I do have an Air data dialer for XP, and I'll look forward to using that on WinMo. Why can't HTML5 just be a real local standard? Unmolested (I'm looking at you WebOS). I'm not certain it's extensive enough for programming, but it certainly sounds like it's in the ballpark. I wish someone like SPB (whose mobileshell just expanded to Android and Symbian) would make that a local widget language. No worry about the cloud but still benefiting from the web standard.

mikelove said:
(but maybe I should buy / start carrying a Nexus One just to see if it can push me over the cliff; seems unlikely Android will have built-in Chinese handwriting on non-Chinese phones anytime soon, so there's a big advantage we'd have over prospective $5 apps)
Evil android?! :wink: I'd definitely be thrilled if you gave it a try -- I don't think I've ever seen you anything even that positive about android before. I'm not 100% sold on Android myself, more like pushed into it for my next device. But it's already made a lot of strides since I opted for WinMo back in November. Once there is a very TP2ish + snapdragon device, it's going to be very tempting.

I'm not an Apple hater, it just doesn't meet my needs, which are much larger than Pleco. One of the reasons I bought the oxford back in the day for Palm was because I already used my Palm every single day for other things. Having a great dictionary without any added bulk (actually, it allowed me to lighten my daily load) was a huge positive.

Thinking about, any chance of a real competitor to Pleco is unlikely. It hasn't happened yet and I don't see anyone too eager to get into the space with a serious product. Since you're at least vaguely maybe considering considering (purposeful double verb) Android, and I really, really want the 现代汉语规范词典, I'm going to go ahead and take the plunge on it sometime in the next few weeks. Worst case scenario, I end up having to keep an old winmo around as a standalone Pleco device even after I upgrade my main mobile to something else. Not super convenient, but then not having Pleco isn't super convenient either. I'm not expecting you to suddenly fall in love with Android and take on all the work that that entails, but consider whatever teeny margin you get on the above my little donation towards thinking about it (I'll post back once I've actually bought so you know the "donation" is in the bank :wink: ). I really was serious about trying a clean break, and likely going back to paper, but if you can have a teeny change of heart, so can I.
 

numble

状元
I'm not an Apple hater, it just doesn't meet my needs, which are much larger than Pleco. One of the reasons I bought the oxford back in the day for Palm was because I already used my Palm every single day for other things. Having a great dictionary without any added bulk (actually, it allowed me to lighten my daily load) was a huge positive.
What about the iPhone doesn't meet your needs?
 

mikelove

皇帝
Staff member
sfrrr - well we already are the "luxury app" on iPhone and we still get *way* more complaints about pricing than we ever did on Palm/WM. But if we sold exclusively outside of Android Market the price comparisons might be less of an issue than they are on iPhone. (as I think we would, there's no reason to tithe Google 30% of our sales if we don't have to - the value proposition for that gets downright terrible once you're charging more than $5 or so for your app, 30% of our monthly sales buys a lot of advertising, plus if we don't need Google's approval for anything I can continue dissing them at my leisure here)

mfcb - that's true, both Android and cloud computing in general are less-than-reliable bets in China it seems.

goulniky - web access isn't quite ubiquitous in the West yet, but I think it's going to make a lot of progress on that front in the next couple of years, and Java versus web-based is a big, long-term strategic decision here.

ipsi - that makes a lot of sense; I've never quite understood why CS programs start everybody out with Java, it's not that much easier than C/C++ but it teaches you far less about how computers actually work. (then again, I tended to sign up for CS classes in things like operating systems and microprocessor design, so I may have an inflated sense of how important it is to learn low-level programming) But since there probably are more Java programmers now than C programmers it's logical to have people develop for your brand new OS with that, performance hit notwithstanding. And after all, most mobile software doesn't have the large base of tricky cross-platform engine code that Pleco does.

There's no approval required on Android either, though there could easily end up being a bunch of Android phone models / carrier versions that refuse to run unsigned code and hence do require you to go through their approval process - again, one of the big pitfalls of supporting Android. But yes, a web-based version gets around all of that, I don't think manufacturers are about to start only supporting manufacturer-approved (or carrier-approved) websites anytime soon...

sui.generis - I think HTML5 will get there eventually - Google absolutely needs it to, and Apple doesn't have any reason to try to stop it (and wouldn't want iPhone to fall behind Android web-browsing-wise-anyway). Of course, Microsoft hates it, and Adobe hates it even more, but neither of them really has the muscle to stop it - witness Steve Jobs' continued dissing of Flash and all things Flash-related. (not necessarily such a good idea with all of the money Apple makes from selling Mac Pros to ardent Photoshoppers, but still...)

Android-wise, I think I'll wait for the Verizon version of the Nexus One this spring (T-Mobile's coverage in my New York is only marginally better than AT&T's) but I might consider taking the plunge then. If I were Google I'd offer iPhone software developers (after a little vetting to make sure they've actually shipped an actually successful app) at-cost or even subsidized Nexus Ones to encourage us to consider Android, but as-is since I'm paying full price I'd like to at least be able to use the thing for regular smartphone stuff too...

I'm delighted to hear about your change of heart, 现代汉语规范词典 is a lovely dictionary, though I should caution you that it's way too early to even be sure we'd offer that in a prospective future Android version (or that you'd be able to transfer your license over if we did).

mfcb again - unfortunately, if you look back at the original article (I don't read Dutch but Google Translate does) they seem to have added a footnote / clarification - see here for the current version of that article translated into English, it now reads "Applications built on the Windows Mobile 6 can probably be made compatible with Windows 7 Phone Series."
 
mikelove said:
I'm delighted to hear about your change of heart, 现代汉语规范词典 is a lovely dictionary, though I should caution you that it's way too early to even be sure we'd offer that in a prospective future Android version (or that you'd be able to transfer your license over if we did).
I only think you're considering considering Android. If that's not an overstatement, we're good.

Ignoring the software license, I had assumed your dictionaries themselves would be able to cross over with me, even if I had to shell out to get pleco the program again. Ages ago I remember some discussion about how you were creating your dictionary licenses to think about users transitioning platforms. Am I right about the dictionaries?
 

mikelove

皇帝
Staff member
"Considering Android" is correct, yes.

All of our dictionary licenses were indeed created with platform transfers in mind, but most license agreements still have to be renewed every few years, and while I certainly don't anticipate this being a problem in the case of 现代汉语规范词典, if that license somehow were no longer in effect at the time we released an Android version, we'd still be able to support people who'd already bought licenses for it on other platforms, but we probably wouldn't be able to bring it over to a new one, particularly since Android would almost certainly require its own modified version of our database format (and hence we'd need to make an Android-specific 现代汉语规范词典 database). So that's why I don't like to promise anything about feature sets / licensed content availability on a particular future platform until we're a lot closer actually having our software ready on it.
 
numble said:
What about the iPhone doesn't meet your needs?
Apple provides a nice, stable user experience, but it comes at a cost of freedom, among other things. Among them are some freedoms I'm unwilling to give up, or spend tons of time fighting and hacking to reclaim. There are other hardware and software issues, but even if those didn't exist, Apple has a consumer in mind other than me. It appears Microsoft does too. Ditto for Blackberry and Symbian while we're at it.

mike said:
most license agreements still have to be renewed every few years, and while I certainly don't anticipate this being a problem in the case of 现代汉语规范词典, if that license somehow were no longer in effect at the time we released an Android version, we'd still be able to support people who'd already bought licenses for it on other platforms, but we probably wouldn't be able to bring it over to a new one, particularly since Android would almost certainly require its own modified version of our database format (and hence we'd need to make an Android-specific 现代汉语规范词典 database).
Issues like this cause me to be more hesitant about web-based content than anything. If I buy xiandai now, I can at least keep it on my WinMo until my WinMo dies, and presumably even get it onto a winmo successor after that. If pleco is a service, a whole series of issues present themselves. Even assuming every cubic meter of the planet were covered with ubiquitous unlimited wireless access, what happens if Pleco passes on or even just evolves beyond Plecodict and stops supporting it? What happens if a license is not renewed or not renewed as is? Even if you write the agreement carefully, you may be hesitant to enforce all your rights if doing so endangers some ongoing relationship with a publisher and you may be forced to do a greater good analysis where my rights get trampled. A dictionary in the hand is worth 4 or 5 in the cloud.
 

mikelove

皇帝
Staff member
sui.generis - that's a reasonable point about an online Pleco, but remember, if this is an online service it will most likely involve a subscription fee instead of a perpetual license. So were we to stop offering a particular dictionary online, you could probably get it online from somebody else instead, and either way you wouldn't have the frustration of having paid for something you could no longer use.

The only ways anyone is really "locked in" to Pleco are the content licenses they've purchased - unfortunate, but unavoidable until the publishing industry adopts the music industry's policy towards DRM (which could be years away) - and their flashcard / user dictionary content. But a subscription service avoids the former problem entirely, and as long as we provide an easy way for you to export your flashcards / user dictionary entries to an open format (as we already do with our offline software), you'd always have the freedom to take your data elsewhere if you no longer wanted to use it with our service.
 

character

状元
mikelove said:
sui.generis - that's a reasonable point about an online Pleco, but remember, if this is an online service it will most likely involve a subscription fee instead of a perpetual license.
I doubt a subscription fee would be a better deal for most of your customers. Years ago I got Pleco Complete? for WM and have not paid any more to Pleco. Yet I show it (now on the iPod Touch) to anyone remotely interested and sing its praises. Aside: if someone doesn't want an iPhone, they should seriously consider getting it on an iPod Touch.

But an online version is nigh useless to me. Most of my time spent using Pleco is on a bus or in Chinese class, both situations with no/crappy connectivity. Also, due to my schedule there can be months where I barely use Pleco; if Pleco was only available by paying a monthly fee I would have to really find all the alternatives available to me to be worse before signing up.

Beyond my needs, have you considered how slow an online version would be for end users performing searches? If you think Java is bad, you should try writing serious amounts of JavaScript to AJAXify your interface. :wink:
 

ipsi

状元
mikelove said:
ipsi - that makes a lot of sense; I've never quite understood why CS programs start everybody out with Java, it's not that much easier than C/C++ but it teaches you far less about how computers actually work. (then again, I tended to sign up for CS classes in things like operating systems and microprocessor design, so I may have an inflated sense of how important it is to learn low-level programming) But since there probably are more Java programmers now than C programmers it's logical to have people develop for your brand new OS with that, performance hit notwithstanding. And after all, most mobile software doesn't have the large base of tricky cross-platform engine code that Pleco does.

There's no approval required on Android either, though there could easily end up being a bunch of Android phone models / carrier versions that refuse to run unsigned code and hence do require you to go through their approval process - again, one of the big pitfalls of supporting Android. But yes, a web-based version gets around all of that, I don't think manufacturers are about to start only supporting manufacturer-approved (or carrier-approved) websites anytime soon...
I'm not 100% sure about that either. I guess they figure that there's less that can go wrong with Java (anecdote: Friend of mine told me about a student down south who managed to write her C code in such a fashion that it brought down the computer and meant it wouldn't turn back on, I believe. Didn't understand why they stopped working, and took down maybe a dozen computers before either she made the connection, or the IT Admins caught up with her. Good luck doing that in Java / C# / Python / etc).

Maybe the logic went something like this: Java comes out. Java is hailed as being 'C++ without any of the problems'. Universities start teaching Java. Businesses note that more graduates are Java-trained, investigate Java. Businesses like Java as it is less risky (bad Java code generally doesn't segfault or otherwise bring down the entire application), and because it is 'the next big thing', begin investing heavily in Java. Universities come down off the 'Java is King' high, but see that local businesses expect graduates to be Java-trained, and thus it becomes a self-reinforcing cycle, where businesses use Java because that's what's taught, and Universities teach it because that's what's used. Note that by Java, I really mean any high-level language that's commonly used and/or taught.

But that's purely me guessing. I was in Primary School when Java 1.0 came out, so I didn't exactly pay much attention to whatever buzz was surrounding it.

As to the App Store fragmentation, yeah, I fully agree with you on that - if the carriers get it into their heads that they will each have their own bloody app store, that could be the death of applications on Android, and probably the death of Android as a brand (though not as an OS - I imagine in that case it would live a life similar to Symbian).

As to carrier-approved websites, that sounds an awful lot like the net neutrality debate. Not sure how much attention you've been paying to that, but it seems that, as a small business owner considering putting a non-trivial portion of your business online as a web application, it should be pretty high up your 'things I care about' list.
 

character

状元
WRT Java, I can give you my impressions, having played with the first beta back in 1995, and using it at work from version 1.1.8 on. Java initially made a splash in the space Flash/AJAX now rules, adding some dynamic elements/interactivity to web pages. But to give Sun (and IBM) credit, they recogized that the Java language coupled with its VM solved a number of existing problems in other areas and devoted lots of programmers to making a complete ecosystem of frameworks. Before Java, to do serious, maintainable programming one would use C or C++.

C lacks object-oriented features which are very helpful on multi-person projects. C++ is very powerful, but it's also complex. Once I worked across the hall from two people supporting a C++ application; half the time they would argue about how the app was supposed to work, and half about how C++ was supposed to work.

Java and its VM had these advantages: It had C-like syntax, but also had object-oriented features (but not all the complexity of C++). Even in the early days there were already APIs for networking and lots of other common operations. The language itself was a good compromise for business programming, lacking exposed pointers (and thus the need to constantly work with them) of C and the pitfalls of C++. The VM let one write a program without worrying about the underlying architecture. Back in the early days Java was "write once, test everywhere" due to some vendors' interesting implementations of the VM. This was still a productivity boost for companies such as IBM, which had to produce software which ran on (at the time) mainframes, AS/400s, and AIX, HP-UX, Solaris, Windows NT, and OS/2. IBM wrote 80% of Java 2 Enterprise Edition, in large part because of how useful/productive Java turned out to be for enterprise programming. Sun was also very active in making frameworks for Java to take it into new areas, such as mobile programming (J2ME).

Java also benefited from the open source movement, as the ability to reuse a program written by a programmer on one architecture/OS would likely work on your target environments with little/no modification.

These days there are such great free tools available for Java programmers, such as the Eclipse editor and many projects available at apache.org, that it's hard to separate the language from everything one can leverage when using it.

ETA: Performance was originally a concern with Java, but at least on the server/desktop, improved VMs have reduced the performance gap between Java programs and native ones to the point it's not worth worrying about for most applications. In the mobile space I suspect that going forward it's not going to be much of an issue either, if the Nexus One I played with is any indication of how Java performs on a 1GHz phone. :wink:
 

daniel123

榜眼
Mike, I am really afraid, you plan to start with online Pleco as a new project. Hope it is ok, to give you my opinion about it.

Maybe in the farer future an online Pleco has its place. But in my opinion during the next one or two years it has not.

1) Mobile Internet today is expensive and not available at all places. This will maybe change in future but I guess not as fast as it needed to be to use online Pleco soon.

2) Mobile Internet in our home countries is one thing. Mobile Internet in foreign countries is another thing. For example I live in Germany. Maybe one or two years in the future I will have a flatrate mobile Internet access in Germany. But I probably will not have it in our neighbour countries where I travel from time to time (for example France, Great Britian, Austria, Italy or so) because it still will be too expensive because my mobile provider just provides a flatrate for Germany. And it will take some many more years before I will have mobile Internet access in China. Additionally different countries have different mobile Internet technologies that are incompatible at least at the moment.

3) Today I do not have to care about mobile internet access. No matter if I am in a plane, a bus or a train, in the tube, on a ship ...

4) Using Internet on mobile devices dramatically decreases the time I can use it until battery charging is needed. Without Wifi and UMTS i can use it more than two days. If using Wifi or UMTS I have to charge after about two hours. Of course that will change in a few years but this does not help me now.

5) Writing Internet software is a nightmare compared to writing "normal" software. If you think the change from c to Java on the mobile world was fast, you can get used to the Web/Internet development world. Look at the last 10 years Nearly every year has minimum a new technology hype. Look at Java/J2EE, PHP, Perl, Active X, Javascript, Flash, Silverlight, Ajax, Air, HTML5, ... And everything should work for any browser (all versions of IE, Firefox, Opera, now also on mobile devices, ipads and so on).

6) If you would continue Pleco for WM and iPhone with cool new features (for example supporting sentences, better audio features, advanced learning abilities) I would pay the same money I already payed again just for using the new features. If you would develop Pleco desktop maybe I would buy it if it brings me real new benefit, maybe even the iPad version. But if you develop online Pleco I cannot imagine to buy it. Maybe others have similar feelings.



Maybe online Pleco is a good vision for the future, but I guess it will take a long time until it is a real alternative for a mobile device. Maybe it could be an alternative for a desktop Pleco if you do a great job. But I guess after some time you will agree that writing web software is a nighmare. :)

The problem now and always is that nobody nows the trends for the future. Normally big new trends come if nobody expected it. The pressure on Microsoft to bring something new that can beat Apple was too big. In this situation they could not be successful. Now Windows Phone 7 and the future of WM is speculation. I think too early to drop it out of your strategy. Now the information Microsoft has given is to small. I just read a few texts and saw a few pictures. I think we really should wait for more information.

I agree to you: WM probably will not be the dominating OS for minimum during the next 18 or 24 month. But this is not a real surprise. But maybe you can also earn good money with Pleco if you continue to support WM 6.5 and maybe WM 7. At least continuing WM 6, 6.1 and 6.5 is not a big thing because you have already all code on this platform.
Compare with writing Chinese software at all: Like WM this is a niche market. When you started developing software the mobile market was also a niche market. Nevertheless you did not write email software or word processing software (as an example) just because it was the most populate software in this time. Sometimes niche strategies can let us earn more money.

Supporting a new Platform is a big project. I think at the moment the best you can do is to wait and concentrate on your existing platforms and bring new features to the iPhone and WM versions or maybe instead start with the desktop project or an improved ipad version. In 6 or 8 months you can look again to the market and have a look for Android, WM 7, etc. In one or two years you can look if the requirements for a online Pleco have changed.

I really think supporting new plattforms is not too important for you. If anybody wants to use an Android or a Blackberry phone and additionally use Pleco he can buy an iPod touch for less than 200 Dollar or Euro and use it as a kind of standalone device parallel to his phone. Of course using everything in one single phone is better, but if the features of Pleco are great enough I think it is worth.

I bought a WM 6.5 phone because at the moment the decision to find the right platform (specially a new platform) is difficult also for the customers. This gives me 12 or 15 more months to use my old software in old look and feel and I have to say the mixture between finger and stylus usage, multimedia, Internet and conventional WM software is great. For me it makes much fun every single day I use it.

Buying this phone saved more than the half of the cost for an iPhone and looking at this saved money I want to say: I would like to pay it for Pleco and its new features in the future. I do not want to pay the money instead for an expensive iPhone or an Internet mobile flatrate. :D
 
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